futurescope:

The Rochester “Invisibility” Cloack

Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered a way to hide large objects from sight using inexpensive (less than $100) and readily available lenses.

invisible cloak

Snip from Reuters:

The so-called Rochester Cloak is not really a tangible cloak at all. Rather the device looks like equipment used by an optometrist. When an object is placed behind the layered lenses it seems to disappear.

Previous cloaking methods have been complicated, expensive, and not able to hide objects in three dimensions when viewed at varying angles, they say.

"From what, we know this is the first cloaking device that provides three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking," said Joseph Choi, a graduate student who helped develop the method at Rochester, which is renowned for its optical research.

In their tests, the researchers have cloaked a hand, a face, and a ruler – making each object appear “invisible” while the image behind the hidden object remains in view. The implications for the discovery are endless, they say.

"I imagine this could be used to cloak a trailer on the back of a semi-truck so the driver can see directly behind him," Choi said. "It can be used for surgery, in the military, in interior design, art."

Don’t miss the behind-the-pysics video from University Rochester: How Does Cloaking Work in the Real World?

[read more] [Rochester Quantum Optics Lab]
[Want to make your own? Here’s a tutorial] [picture by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester]

My alma mater continues to push the limits when it comes to optical engineering.

Inkantatory Paper from takahiro on Vimeo.

videovault:

Inkantatory Paper proposes an effective combination of multiple functional inks, including conductive silver ink, thermo-chromic ink, and regular inkjet ink, for a novel paper-based interface called Inkantatory Paper that can dynamically change the color of its printed pattern. Constructed with off-the-shelf inkjet printing using silver conductive ink, our system enables users to fabricate thin, flat, flexible, and low-cost interactive paper. We evaluated the characteristics of the conductive silver ink as a heating system for the thermo-chromic ink and created applications demonstrating the usability of the system.

biocanvas:

Breathing tubes of a silkworm
A silkworm is the caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori. Domesticated silkworms are entirely dependent on humans for survival, where they are mass bred to produce silk. The silk from Bombyx mori is more fragile and delicate than spider silk, which is five times stronger than steel but harder to obtain than its silkworm counterpart. Scientists in Japan have recently introduced a gene encoding spider silk into silkworms, producing silk that is 50% stronger and could be invaluable in manufacturing protective suits and better surgical sutures.
Image by Michael Gibson.

biocanvas:

Breathing tubes of a silkworm

A silkworm is the caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori. Domesticated silkworms are entirely dependent on humans for survival, where they are mass bred to produce silk. The silk from Bombyx mori is more fragile and delicate than spider silk, which is five times stronger than steel but harder to obtain than its silkworm counterpart. Scientists in Japan have recently introduced a gene encoding spider silk into silkworms, producing silk that is 50% stronger and could be invaluable in manufacturing protective suits and better surgical sutures.

Image by Michael Gibson.

Car’s Rooftop Device Makes Electricity From Rushing Wind

txchnologist:

image

by Michael Keller

There are more places for electric vehicles to get power than just onboard batteries and stationary charging stations. Korean university and Samsung engineers say they have created a generator that makes electricity from flapping materials.

Their prototype, which can be mounted to an automobile’s roof, harnesses the triboelectric effect. This is the same phenomenon that causes a static charge to build up when a person walks across a carpet or a glass rod is rubbed with silk.

image

Read More

springwise:

Portable, wireless cash register is designed for informal economies
Running a business in environments such as Africa is a completely different challenge than in the Western world thanks to lack of access to electricity and unreliable internet infrastructure. In the past we’ve seen portable devices such as the eChaja enable anyone to sell phone charging facilities wherever they are. Now Nomanini has created a rugged point-of-sale register that can facilitate cash payments for airtime, electricity and insurance. READ MORE…

springwise:

Portable, wireless cash register is designed for informal economies

Running a business in environments such as Africa is a completely different challenge than in the Western world thanks to lack of access to electricity and unreliable internet infrastructure. In the past we’ve seen portable devices such as the eChaja enable anyone to sell phone charging facilities wherever they are. Now Nomanini has created a rugged point-of-sale register that can facilitate cash payments for airtime, electricity and insurance. READ MORE…

(via zoeaday)

unconsumption:


No cardboard, no cellophane, no throwaway plastic trays, and no brands: Berlin’s newest supermarket is certainly a step away from the usual neighborhood grocery store.
Opened last Saturday, Original Unverpackt (the name translates to “Original Unpackaged”) is a novel shop in Berlin’s Kreuzberg neighborhood that has dispensed entirely with disposable packaging. Granted, the term “supermarket” might be a little grandiose for this small but tightly packed store, but the concept’s legs are as long as the store’s frontage is narrow.
Not only is a minimum-waste grocery store a canny business idea in a country that’s packed with green-conscious consumers, it’s also an interesting pilot project relevant to any city trying to cut their landfill and recycling burden.

 (via The Supermarket of the Future Has No Packaging - CityLab)

unconsumption:

No cardboard, no cellophane, no throwaway plastic trays, and no brands: Berlin’s newest supermarket is certainly a step away from the usual neighborhood grocery store.

Opened last Saturday, Original Unverpackt (the name translates to “Original Unpackaged”) is a novel shop in Berlin’s Kreuzberg neighborhood that has dispensed entirely with disposable packaging. Granted, the term “supermarket” might be a little grandiose for this small but tightly packed store, but the concept’s legs are as long as the store’s frontage is narrow.

Not only is a minimum-waste grocery store a canny business idea in a country that’s packed with green-conscious consumers, it’s also an interesting pilot project relevant to any city trying to cut their landfill and recycling burden.

 (via The Supermarket of the Future Has No Packaging - CityLab)

(via zoeaday)