Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue
Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.
Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.
The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.
What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.

Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.

Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.

The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.

What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.

The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership
Since Miles Finch Innovation opened its doors in 2012, we’ve championed the development of creative leadership capabilities for our C-Suite clients. For over 10 years, I’ve had the privilege of leading corporate innovation teams; I can tell you first hand that the lack of creative-leadership skills represents the biggest leadership abyss in corporate America today. It’s why nearly every CEO who says she’s committed to innovation, also confesses she’s underwhelmed with the quality of ideas in the pipeline.
To fill this critical void, I’m thrilled to announce that Miles Finch Innovation, on Monday August 25th, is launching an exciting new podcast series entitled, “The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership.” We’ve partnered with the amazing Todd Schnick of Dreamland Media to produce a nine-part series illustrating each Seven C Competency: communication, curiosity, creativity, connecting, culture, change management and courage. We have a fabulous AAA lineup of guests who operate on the frontline of innovation. They’re going to share their firsthand perspective of what it really takes to lead innovation and foster a culture of creativity.
We’re going to arm you with practical applications that can be put into practice immediately, so you can model the powerful behaviors of an effective creative leader. You’ll put yourself, and your organization, on a path to creativity and successful innovation.
You can access each episode from our podcast landing page.  We hope you’ll join us! 

The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership

Since Miles Finch Innovation opened its doors in 2012, we’ve championed the development of creative leadership capabilities for our C-Suite clients. For over 10 years, I’ve had the privilege of leading corporate innovation teams; I can tell you first hand that the lack of creative-leadership skills represents the biggest leadership abyss in corporate America today. It’s why nearly every CEO who says she’s committed to innovation, also confesses she’s underwhelmed with the quality of ideas in the pipeline.

To fill this critical void, I’m thrilled to announce that Miles Finch Innovation, on Monday August 25th, is launching an exciting new podcast series entitled, “The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership.” We’ve partnered with the amazing Todd Schnick of Dreamland Media to produce a nine-part series illustrating each Seven C Competency: communication, curiosity, creativity, connecting, culture, change management and courage. We have a fabulous AAA lineup of guests who operate on the frontline of innovation. They’re going to share their firsthand perspective of what it really takes to lead innovation and foster a culture of creativity.

We’re going to arm you with practical applications that can be put into practice immediately, so you can model the powerful behaviors of an effective creative leader. You’ll put yourself, and your organization, on a path to creativity and successful innovation.

You can access each episode from our podcast landing page.  We hope you’ll join us! 

The Rocky Mount Brewmill, Coming 2015 from ExitEvent on Vimeo.

Rocky Mount Brewmill

This is an interesting concept:  a craft beer incubator.  The Rocky Mount Brewmill is scheduled to open in 2015 at the old Rocky Mount textile mill on the Tar River in North Carolina.  The campus will teach people the art of brewing as well as provide the infrastructure to support production.

It’s also a great way to utilize a vacant, historical site.  Certainly a concept that could be borrowed in other markets.

Tons of innovative opportunities in the field of macrophages. I got to explore this area in my last corporate job and I remain very, very intrigued. Fascinating stuff.
biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver
Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.
Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

Tons of innovative opportunities in the field of macrophages. I got to explore this area in my last corporate job and I remain very, very intrigued. Fascinating stuff.

biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver

Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.

Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

futurescope:

Squishy Robots from MIT and Boston Dynamics

A new phase-changing material built from wax and foam developed by researchers at MIT is capable of switching between hard and soft states. Learn more: http://mitne.ws/1wlz4bn.

Robots built from this material would be able to operate more like biological systems with applications ranging from difficult search and rescue operations, squeezing through rubble looking for survivors, to deformable surgical robots that could move through the body to reach a particular point without damaging any of the organs or vessels along the way.

Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News
Additional video clips courtesy of Nadia Cheng

[read more]

generalelectric:

Pictured above is the world’s largest indoor farm illuminated by LEDs, which opened this month in Japan. Inside, 18 cultivation racks reach 15 levels high, and are outfitted with 17,500 GE LED light fixtures developed specifically for this facility. The indoor farm can grow lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, and is already producing 10,000 heads of it per day. Read more about this breakthrough in modern farming at GE Reports.