Tons of innovative opportunities in the field of macrophages. I got to explore this area in my last corporate job and I remain very, very intrigued. Fascinating stuff.
biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver
Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.
Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

Tons of innovative opportunities in the field of macrophages. I got to explore this area in my last corporate job and I remain very, very intrigued. Fascinating stuff.

biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver

Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.

Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

futurescope:

Squishy Robots from MIT and Boston Dynamics

A new phase-changing material built from wax and foam developed by researchers at MIT is capable of switching between hard and soft states. Learn more: http://mitne.ws/1wlz4bn.

Robots built from this material would be able to operate more like biological systems with applications ranging from difficult search and rescue operations, squeezing through rubble looking for survivors, to deformable surgical robots that could move through the body to reach a particular point without damaging any of the organs or vessels along the way.

Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News
Additional video clips courtesy of Nadia Cheng

[read more]

generalelectric:

Pictured above is the world’s largest indoor farm illuminated by LEDs, which opened this month in Japan. Inside, 18 cultivation racks reach 15 levels high, and are outfitted with 17,500 GE LED light fixtures developed specifically for this facility. The indoor farm can grow lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, and is already producing 10,000 heads of it per day. Read more about this breakthrough in modern farming at GE Reports.   

The FCC’s controversial plans for a new version of net neutrality are still open for public comment for a few more days, and Chairman Tom Wheeler — continuing to fight charges that he may be a dingo — says it’s already received over 647,000 comments so far. The 60 day period for public comment runs out on the 15th though, so if you want your voice to be heard then about fast lanes, Title II or anything else, then now is the time.

FCC’s net neutrality inbox is already stuffed with 647k messages, get yours in by Tuesday (via wilwheaton)

(via upworthy)

The Iron Man Juggles Cars!

BugJuggler is a 70ft tall robot concept that uses hydraulic cylinders to juggle cars.  Hailed as “a new frontier in robotic entertainment,” the folks behind BugJuggler are actively seeking investment and sponsorship opportunities. Wouldn’t you like to see this thing live?

Via BugJuggler.com:

BugJuggler will use a diesel engine to generate hydraulic pressure. An operator located in the robot’s head will be able to control its motions using a haptic feedback interface connected to high-speed servo valves. Hydraulic accumulators - essentially storage batteries for hydraulic fluid - will allow for the rapid movement required for the robot to juggle cars or other large, heavy objects. 

BugJuggler represents a new frontier in robotic entertainment. Moving beyond the car crushing robots of the past century, BugJuggler will use 21st century technology to perform breathtaking feats including juggling up to three cars simultaneously. Please contact us to discuss exciting investment and sponsorship opportunities. 

You can learn more about the technology behind the concept here.