Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue
Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.
Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.
The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.
What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.

Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.

Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.

The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.

What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.

The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership
Since Miles Finch Innovation opened its doors in 2012, we’ve championed the development of creative leadership capabilities for our C-Suite clients. For over 10 years, I’ve had the privilege of leading corporate innovation teams; I can tell you first hand that the lack of creative-leadership skills represents the biggest leadership abyss in corporate America today. It’s why nearly every CEO who says she’s committed to innovation, also confesses she’s underwhelmed with the quality of ideas in the pipeline.
To fill this critical void, I’m thrilled to announce that Miles Finch Innovation, on Monday August 25th, is launching an exciting new podcast series entitled, “The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership.” We’ve partnered with the amazing Todd Schnick of Dreamland Media to produce a nine-part series illustrating each Seven C Competency: communication, curiosity, creativity, connecting, culture, change management and courage. We have a fabulous AAA lineup of guests who operate on the frontline of innovation. They’re going to share their firsthand perspective of what it really takes to lead innovation and foster a culture of creativity.
We’re going to arm you with practical applications that can be put into practice immediately, so you can model the powerful behaviors of an effective creative leader. You’ll put yourself, and your organization, on a path to creativity and successful innovation.
You can access each episode from our podcast landing page.  We hope you’ll join us! 

The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership

Since Miles Finch Innovation opened its doors in 2012, we’ve championed the development of creative leadership capabilities for our C-Suite clients. For over 10 years, I’ve had the privilege of leading corporate innovation teams; I can tell you first hand that the lack of creative-leadership skills represents the biggest leadership abyss in corporate America today. It’s why nearly every CEO who says she’s committed to innovation, also confesses she’s underwhelmed with the quality of ideas in the pipeline.

To fill this critical void, I’m thrilled to announce that Miles Finch Innovation, on Monday August 25th, is launching an exciting new podcast series entitled, “The Seven C’s of Creative Leadership.” We’ve partnered with the amazing Todd Schnick of Dreamland Media to produce a nine-part series illustrating each Seven C Competency: communication, curiosity, creativity, connecting, culture, change management and courage. We have a fabulous AAA lineup of guests who operate on the frontline of innovation. They’re going to share their firsthand perspective of what it really takes to lead innovation and foster a culture of creativity.

We’re going to arm you with practical applications that can be put into practice immediately, so you can model the powerful behaviors of an effective creative leader. You’ll put yourself, and your organization, on a path to creativity and successful innovation.

You can access each episode from our podcast landing page.  We hope you’ll join us! 

fastcompany:

This Band Of Small Robots Could Build Entire Skyscrapers Without Human Help
Even though most buildings are designed using the latest digital tools, actual construction is stuck in the past; building is messy, slow, and inefficient. 3-D printing might change that, but recent projects like these printed houses in China demonstrate one of the technical challenges—the equipment itself has to be gigantic, because it can’t work unless it’s bigger than the building itself.
A team of researchers from Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia are working on another solution: A swarm of tiny robots that could cover the construction site of the future, quickly and cheaply building greener buildings of any size.
Read More>

fastcompany:

This Band Of Small Robots Could Build Entire Skyscrapers Without Human Help

Even though most buildings are designed using the latest digital tools, actual construction is stuck in the past; building is messy, slow, and inefficient. 3-D printing might change that, but recent projects like these printed houses in China demonstrate one of the technical challenges—the equipment itself has to be gigantic, because it can’t work unless it’s bigger than the building itself.

A team of researchers from Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia are working on another solution: A swarm of tiny robots that could cover the construction site of the future, quickly and cheaply building greener buildings of any size.

Read More>

Hot Dogs, Lee Iacocca and The Power of Rapport
There is nothing more forbidding than a new idea. The appearance of a novel concept begs the skeptic in us to search for its fatal flaw. Most great ideas challenge the status quo and are instantly imbued with risk and complexity. Our disdain for change and fear of failure usually combine to cause a search for everything that is possibly wrong with the idea, right up until it’s blatantly obvious that the “old way” is far superior to the new idea in question. “Phew. Thank goodness we didn’t let THAT crazy idea get approved!”
Those in the business of selling ideas are not strangers to this song and dance. For people in advertising, there’s an art to setting up an campaign idea before any script is presented.  This skill isn’t just about explaining what the audience will see; it’s about building rapport.
Read more at Miles Finch Innovation.

Hot Dogs, Lee Iacocca and The Power of Rapport

There is nothing more forbidding than a new idea. The appearance of a novel concept begs the skeptic in us to search for its fatal flaw. Most great ideas challenge the status quo and are instantly imbued with risk and complexity. Our disdain for change and fear of failure usually combine to cause a search for everything that is possibly wrong with the idea, right up until it’s blatantly obvious that the “old way” is far superior to the new idea in question. “Phew. Thank goodness we didn’t let THAT crazy idea get approved!”

Those in the business of selling ideas are not strangers to this song and dance. For people in advertising, there’s an art to setting up an campaign idea before any script is presented.  This skill isn’t just about explaining what the audience will see; it’s about building rapport.

Read more at Miles Finch Innovation.

I try not to overuse the word brilliant, but this is brilliant.  I’m ready to go home and grab a shovel.

David Pagan Butler built a natural swimming pool that has clear water without using chemicals.  Using plants, animals and solar energy, this concept provides a sustainable option for summer fun.  Best of all, it’s not that costly or complicated to build.

David Pagan Butler:

"Swimming in natural water is a delight to our senses. Your skin and hair feels soft and your eyes don’t sting. It seems as if every cell in your body is telling you — this is the way swimming should be."

An Ostentation of Peacocks
It’s remarkable: as countless authors and bloggers have waxed poetic about innovation the past several years, most ignored the lack of a clear relationship between specific leadership behaviors and innovation. What does it really take to lead innovation in a corporation? There’s not a tremendous amount of consensus on this critical question.
Instead, we’ve been inundated with thousands of philosophical articles about what innovation is and isn’t, or what it takes to “make it happen.” It sounds so simple – implement a process, follow these 10 tips, and out pops a billion dollar new product. Sure thing.
For those of us who work on the frontlines of corporate innovation, these articles may provide some inspiration and insight, but they rarely deliver on “making innovation happen.” Innovating is just not that simple.
Consultants can strut their philosophy like ostentatious peacocks in search of a mate; but let’s be honest, until they help their clients develop the creative leadership skills necessary to create an idea-friendly climate, much of what they offer won’t significantly improve long-term innovation performance.
Read more at Miles Finch Innovation

An Ostentation of Peacocks

It’s remarkable: as countless authors and bloggers have waxed poetic about innovation the past several years, most ignored the lack of a clear relationship between specific leadership behaviors and innovation. What does it really take to lead innovation in a corporation? There’s not a tremendous amount of consensus on this critical question.

Instead, we’ve been inundated with thousands of philosophical articles about what innovation is and isn’t, or what it takes to “make it happen.” It sounds so simple – implement a process, follow these 10 tips, and out pops a billion dollar new product. Sure thing.

For those of us who work on the frontlines of corporate innovation, these articles may provide some inspiration and insight, but they rarely deliver on “making innovation happen.” Innovating is just not that simple.

Consultants can strut their philosophy like ostentatious peacocks in search of a mate; but let’s be honest, until they help their clients develop the creative leadership skills necessary to create an idea-friendly climate, much of what they offer won’t significantly improve long-term innovation performance.

Read more at Miles Finch Innovation

My Interview with Todd Schnick on Business in the Morning.
I had a wonderful time talking about innovation and creative leadership on Todd Schnick’s Business in the Morning radio show.
During the course of the interview, we land on a definition of innovation that we all can live with:  ”innovation is capturing value from ideas.”  Using Miles Finch Innovation’s Idea Climate Equation® as a guide, we discuss key leadership responsibilities that are critical for fostering a climate that is conducive to creativity and innovation.  The chat concludes with a few tips people can implement today to build their creative leadership skills and foster a climate that protects and nurtures ideas.

My Interview with Todd Schnick on Business in the Morning.

I had a wonderful time talking about innovation and creative leadership on Todd Schnick’s Business in the Morning radio show.

During the course of the interview, we land on a definition of innovation that we all can live with:  ”innovation is capturing value from ideas.”  Using Miles Finch Innovation’s Idea Climate Equation® as a guide, we discuss key leadership responsibilities that are critical for fostering a climate that is conducive to creativity and innovation.  The chat concludes with a few tips people can implement today to build their creative leadership skills and foster a climate that protects and nurtures ideas.