futurescope:

The Rochester “Invisibility” Cloack

Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered a way to hide large objects from sight using inexpensive (less than $100) and readily available lenses.

invisible cloak

Snip from Reuters:

The so-called Rochester Cloak is not really a tangible cloak at all. Rather the device looks like equipment used by an optometrist. When an object is placed behind the layered lenses it seems to disappear.

Previous cloaking methods have been complicated, expensive, and not able to hide objects in three dimensions when viewed at varying angles, they say.

"From what, we know this is the first cloaking device that provides three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking," said Joseph Choi, a graduate student who helped develop the method at Rochester, which is renowned for its optical research.

In their tests, the researchers have cloaked a hand, a face, and a ruler – making each object appear “invisible” while the image behind the hidden object remains in view. The implications for the discovery are endless, they say.

"I imagine this could be used to cloak a trailer on the back of a semi-truck so the driver can see directly behind him," Choi said. "It can be used for surgery, in the military, in interior design, art."

Don’t miss the behind-the-pysics video from University Rochester: How Does Cloaking Work in the Real World?

[read more] [Rochester Quantum Optics Lab]
[Want to make your own? Here’s a tutorial] [picture by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester]

My alma mater continues to push the limits when it comes to optical engineering.

Car’s Rooftop Device Makes Electricity From Rushing Wind

txchnologist:

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by Michael Keller

There are more places for electric vehicles to get power than just onboard batteries and stationary charging stations. Korean university and Samsung engineers say they have created a generator that makes electricity from flapping materials.

Their prototype, which can be mounted to an automobile’s roof, harnesses the triboelectric effect. This is the same phenomenon that causes a static charge to build up when a person walks across a carpet or a glass rod is rubbed with silk.

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Read More

AccuVein AV400 Uses Infrared Technology to Find Veins

Very cool technology that’s sure to make a big difference for medical professionals and patients alike!

Company Website: http://www.accuvein.com/

Via KSLA:

The system is designed to help healthcare professionals locate veins for venipuncture. It uses a safe beam of light, projected onto a patient’s arm, to reveal a map of the peripheral veins on the skin’s surface. 

According to a statement released by Willis Knighton, venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure worldwide with an estimated 2.7 million procedures conducted every day in the United States alone. Studies reveal that up to one third of attempts to access a vein fail the first time, creating unnecessary patient discomfort as well as additional costs. Improving first-stick attempts is a major goal for healthcare providers around the world.

Even the most experienced healthcare professionals can have difficulty accessing veins safely and quickly the first time. While this will be available for use on adult and pediatric units throughout the hospital, the patient care staff will find it especially helpful with patients who are dehydrated, obese, have low body temperature, whose veins roll and those who have had frequent venipuncture during treatments.

"This is going to be good for the nursing staff but even better for our patients," said Georgia Stephens, MSN, RN, patient care coordinator for staff development at Willis-Knighton Medical Center. "It illuminates the arm so the veins are easy to see. The AccuVein System does not touch the patient. Its use will enhance the comfort and safety of the patient and increase nursing efficiency."

Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue
Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.
Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.
The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.
What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.

Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.

Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.

The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.

What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.

The Iron Man Juggles Cars!

BugJuggler is a 70ft tall robot concept that uses hydraulic cylinders to juggle cars.  Hailed as “a new frontier in robotic entertainment,” the folks behind BugJuggler are actively seeking investment and sponsorship opportunities. Wouldn’t you like to see this thing live?

Via BugJuggler.com:

BugJuggler will use a diesel engine to generate hydraulic pressure. An operator located in the robot’s head will be able to control its motions using a haptic feedback interface connected to high-speed servo valves. Hydraulic accumulators - essentially storage batteries for hydraulic fluid - will allow for the rapid movement required for the robot to juggle cars or other large, heavy objects. 

BugJuggler represents a new frontier in robotic entertainment. Moving beyond the car crushing robots of the past century, BugJuggler will use 21st century technology to perform breathtaking feats including juggling up to three cars simultaneously. Please contact us to discuss exciting investment and sponsorship opportunities. 

You can learn more about the technology behind the concept here.

I demo’d this at the 99U Conference a few weeks ago.  It’s amazing and I want one!

fastcodesign:

Adobe’s New Pen And Ruler Tease The Future Of Digital Creativity

Its not just a neat stylus and ruler. If Adobes new tools are a hit, Photoshop, Illustrator, and After Effects change forever.

I draw a perfectly straight line on my iPad. Then I bisect it at a true 90 degrees. I draw triangles and circles and squares until the screen is cacophony of pristine shapes.

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I’m using Adobe’s new hardware—a stylus called Ink and a ruler called Slide, which are available as a pair for $200 today. Born from an unfunded, skunkworks project within Adobe’s walls, the company teamed with Ammunition—the same design firm behind Beats—to craft this aluminum hardware that teases the future of the company and how all of us will create digital media tomorrow.

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“Our interaction methods are pretty long in the tooth. The mouse and keyboard are growing ancient. A lot of things we did were innovations 20 years ago. Now they’re habituations,” admits Michael Gough, vice president of Experience Design, Adobe. “We’re used to using that control key. Was that the best way we could expose that experience? Probably not.”

Read More>

(via fastcompany)