Outsmarting Thieves With Smart Water

txchnologist:

image

by Marsha Lewis, Inside Science

Last year, there were more than two million burglaries and six million thefts in the United States.  Now, police are adding another tool to help track down criminals and stolen goods.

The FBI estimates 1 in 36 homes will be burglarized this year.  Now, homeowners and police are adding a new crime-fighting tool for your precious valuables.

Read More

springwise:

Wristbands let marketers know consumers’ real feelings
Customer feedback surveys are one way to learn more about how users feel about a product or service, but they’re often time consuming and depend on consumers’ willingness to complete them. Is there an easier way to directly tap customer sentiment? We’ve already seen DJs use wearable tech such as Lightwave to track live audience reactions to the music. Now XOX is using similar technology to gauge the reaction of crowds through biometric wristbands. READ MORE…

springwise:

Wristbands let marketers know consumers’ real feelings

Customer feedback surveys are one way to learn more about how users feel about a product or service, but they’re often time consuming and depend on consumers’ willingness to complete them. Is there an easier way to directly tap customer sentiment? We’ve already seen DJs use wearable tech such as Lightwave to track live audience reactions to the music. Now XOX is using similar technology to gauge the reaction of crowds through biometric wristbands. READ MORE…

I don’t think I’m going to be an early adopter of these types of refrigerators.

futurescope:

Legacy Futures #1: Talking Refrigerators

Ladies & Gentleman, the moment you have been all waiting for:

Introducing the talking flat-pack marketing future T9000 Four-Door Fridge Freezer from Samsung with Arduino Sensors and simple AI to promote itself and its features.

Why? Honestly, I’ve absolutely no idea. But PSFK describes the intention of Samsung as follows:

This non-intrusive, personalized experience for shoppers, made them feel comfortable exploring the new fridge in their own time, without the need for pushy sales people interfering. A brand new T9000 refrigerator was placed in-store, with motion sensors installed inside. When movement was sensed in any of the interior compartments, the sensors activated a voice playback that spoke to the shopper and explained the fridge’s individual features and benefits.

The Talking Fridge has a sticker on the front, greeting customers and instructing them to open the door if they’d like to get to know the refrigerator better. There are other tags inside, with different elements that can be manipulated by customers in order to hear more information about them, including a foldable shelf, an easy slide shelf, and a big box.

A tablet next to the fridge enabled users to explore its many features on a mobile app, such as timeless design, smart organization, and optimum freshness. Visual guides with videos showed them all the details about aspects like the triple cooling system, which maintains optimal temperatures in every compartment for longer-lasting freshness.

It’s horrible in so many ways… Just think of your local electronics store in the near future featuring fridges, washing & coffe machines, tablets, hairdryer etc. talking to you with the voice of your favorite starlet, texting you relentlessly near-field mobile push notifications and showing you 24/7 exaggerated video advertisements.

Ah, almost forgotten. Did I mentioned, that all devices will be connected to social media (yay!) & supervise you & your friends (boo!)? Joys of the interconnected world.

[T9000] [via psfk]

prostheticknowledge:

INFOGRAPHIC: China’s high-speed rail vision
The South China Morning Post has put together an infographic visualizing a potentional cross-continental high-speed rail network that would not only connect London to China, but also America and Singapore:

China is proposing five high-speed international railway networks that would ultimately connect the UK at one end, America at another and Singapore in the south, with China in the centre. The large number of countries involved requires Herculean efforts of diplomacy, technology and economics.

More at South China Morning Post here

prostheticknowledge:

INFOGRAPHIC: China’s high-speed rail vision

The South China Morning Post has put together an infographic visualizing a potentional cross-continental high-speed rail network that would not only connect London to China, but also America and Singapore:

China is proposing five high-speed international railway networks that would ultimately connect the UK at one end, America at another and Singapore in the south, with China in the centre. The large number of countries involved requires Herculean efforts of diplomacy, technology and economics.

More at South China Morning Post here

(via futurescope)

futurescope:

The Rochester “Invisibility” Cloack

Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered a way to hide large objects from sight using inexpensive (less than $100) and readily available lenses.

invisible cloak

Snip from Reuters:

The so-called Rochester Cloak is not really a tangible cloak at all. Rather the device looks like equipment used by an optometrist. When an object is placed behind the layered lenses it seems to disappear.

Previous cloaking methods have been complicated, expensive, and not able to hide objects in three dimensions when viewed at varying angles, they say.

"From what, we know this is the first cloaking device that provides three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking," said Joseph Choi, a graduate student who helped develop the method at Rochester, which is renowned for its optical research.

In their tests, the researchers have cloaked a hand, a face, and a ruler – making each object appear “invisible” while the image behind the hidden object remains in view. The implications for the discovery are endless, they say.

"I imagine this could be used to cloak a trailer on the back of a semi-truck so the driver can see directly behind him," Choi said. "It can be used for surgery, in the military, in interior design, art."

Don’t miss the behind-the-pysics video from University Rochester: How Does Cloaking Work in the Real World?

[read more] [Rochester Quantum Optics Lab]
[Want to make your own? Here’s a tutorial] [picture by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester]

My alma mater continues to push the limits when it comes to optical engineering.

Car’s Rooftop Device Makes Electricity From Rushing Wind

txchnologist:

image

by Michael Keller

There are more places for electric vehicles to get power than just onboard batteries and stationary charging stations. Korean university and Samsung engineers say they have created a generator that makes electricity from flapping materials.

Their prototype, which can be mounted to an automobile’s roof, harnesses the triboelectric effect. This is the same phenomenon that causes a static charge to build up when a person walks across a carpet or a glass rod is rubbed with silk.

image

Read More

AccuVein AV400 Uses Infrared Technology to Find Veins

Very cool technology that’s sure to make a big difference for medical professionals and patients alike!

Company Website: http://www.accuvein.com/

Via KSLA:

The system is designed to help healthcare professionals locate veins for venipuncture. It uses a safe beam of light, projected onto a patient’s arm, to reveal a map of the peripheral veins on the skin’s surface. 

According to a statement released by Willis Knighton, venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure worldwide with an estimated 2.7 million procedures conducted every day in the United States alone. Studies reveal that up to one third of attempts to access a vein fail the first time, creating unnecessary patient discomfort as well as additional costs. Improving first-stick attempts is a major goal for healthcare providers around the world.

Even the most experienced healthcare professionals can have difficulty accessing veins safely and quickly the first time. While this will be available for use on adult and pediatric units throughout the hospital, the patient care staff will find it especially helpful with patients who are dehydrated, obese, have low body temperature, whose veins roll and those who have had frequent venipuncture during treatments.

"This is going to be good for the nursing staff but even better for our patients," said Georgia Stephens, MSN, RN, patient care coordinator for staff development at Willis-Knighton Medical Center. "It illuminates the arm so the veins are easy to see. The AccuVein System does not touch the patient. Its use will enhance the comfort and safety of the patient and increase nursing efficiency."

Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue
Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.
Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.
The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.
What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.

Scientists Developing ‘Biochips’ That Mimic Our Body’s Tissue

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley are working on an interesting concept that may help scientists develop drugs faster.

Via InternetMedicine.com:

Right now, inside a lab at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers are working to make that happen. They’re trying to grow human organ tissue, like heart and liver, on tiny chips. These aren’t your standard computer chips. They’re miniature networks, derived from adult skin cells coerced into becoming the type of tissue scientists want to study, that grow on miniscule pipe-like plastic chambers glued atop a microscope slide.

The research is designed to find ways to get that tissue to live and mimic how real human organs function. If so, they could provide a cheap and quick way of weeding out treatments that are toxic or just don’t work. The aim is to weed them out early on, in the lab, replacing at least some of the tedious years of testing on animals and humans.

What’s more, because drugs traditionally are developed with a one-size-fits-all approach, clinicians often don’t know how well medications will work on individual patients. According Anurag Mathur, one of the Berkeley researchers, these chips could lead to “a personalized medicine, patient-specific readout of any drug you want to test.”

Read the rest here.