Warka-like water tower can provide 25 gallons of clean drinking water per day thanks to a thoughtful design and condensation.
Via Smithsonian.com:

At first glance, the 30-foot-tall, vase-shaped towers, named after a fig tree native to Ethiopia, have the look and feel of a showy art installation. But every detail, from carefully-placed curves to unique materials, has a functional purpose.
The rigid outer housing of each tower is comprised of lightweight and elastic juncus stalks, woven in a pattern that offers stability in the face of strong wind gusts while still allowing air to flow through. A mesh net made of nylon or  polypropylene, which calls to mind a large Chinese lantern, hangs inside, collecting droplets of dew that form along the surface. As cold air condenses, the droplets roll down into a container at the bottom of the tower. The water in the container then passes through a tube that functions as a faucet, carrying the water to those waiting on the ground.

Warka-like water tower can provide 25 gallons of clean drinking water per day thanks to a thoughtful design and condensation.

Via Smithsonian.com:

At first glance, the 30-foot-tall, vase-shaped towers, named after a fig tree native to Ethiopia, have the look and feel of a showy art installation. But every detail, from carefully-placed curves to unique materials, has a functional purpose.

The rigid outer housing of each tower is comprised of lightweight and elastic juncus stalks, woven in a pattern that offers stability in the face of strong wind gusts while still allowing air to flow through. A mesh net made of nylon or  polypropylene, which calls to mind a large Chinese lantern, hangs inside, collecting droplets of dew that form along the surface. As cold air condenses, the droplets roll down into a container at the bottom of the tower. The water in the container then passes through a tube that functions as a faucet, carrying the water to those waiting on the ground.

I have to give these folks credit for trying to improve the pizza box.  I’m not sure eating off of a piece of corrugated cardboard is for everyone, but it will certainly appeal to some.  

Learn more at www.greenboxny.com

About Ecovention:

Ecovention, LLC is a design, licensing firm and manufacturing firm dedicated to improving outmoded, outdated and wasteful food packaging. Ecovention, LLC is marketing its first product, the GreenBox (US Patent 7,051,919), a pizza box manufactured from 100% recycled material. The top of the GreenBox breaks down into convenient serving plates, eliminating the need for disposable plates. The bottom of the ‘GreenBox’ converts easily into a handy storage container, eliminating the need for plastic wrap, tin foil or plastic bags. The perforations and scores that create this functionality allow for easy disposal into a standard-sized recycling bin. Made from a standard pizza blank, the GreenBox requires no additional material or major redesign and can therefore be produced at no additional manufacturing cost. Ecovention, LLC owns the utility patent on the GreenBox. 

unconsumption:


Two Swedish designers are turning rejected and recycled materials into beautiful, colorful rugs.
 Katarina Brieditis and Katarina Evans of Stockholm have been repurposing old Salvation Army swag into stunning floor-coverings since August 2012, with the aim of producing one new piece on a monthly basis. They employ several methods to create their final products, from the more traditional knitting and sewing to more specific crocheting and plaiting.

 (via Design Duo Turn Thrift Store Sweaters Into Rugs - PSFK)

unconsumption:

Two Swedish designers are turning rejected and recycled materials into beautiful, colorful rugs.

 Katarina Brieditis and Katarina Evans of Stockholm have been repurposing old Salvation Army swag into stunning floor-coverings since August 2012, with the aim of producing one new piece on a monthly basis. They employ several methods to create their final products, from the more traditional knitting and sewing to more specific crocheting and plaiting.

 (via Design Duo Turn Thrift Store Sweaters Into Rugs - PSFK)

Pavegen harnesses electricity from footsteps.

Learn more about this cool technology and initiative on their Kickstarter page.

Create electricity, just by walking to class.  Pavegen is kickstarting the future of renewable energy education with power from your footsteps.  We’ve developed and proven the technology, and now we need your help to bring it to life in schools around the world.

Pavegen harnesses the kinetic energy from footsteps and converts it into renewable electricity.  Just by stepping, jumping, or hopping on a Pavegen floor tile, people create clean, off-grid electricity used to power multiple applications — from lighting, to interactive learning displays and charging points.  Data on the energy harvested and footfall can be sent immediately to any web address from each unit.

Source:  Pavegen - Kickstarter Page